How to create macro in access 2007

how to create macro in access 2007

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Enable Macros in Microsoft Access Step 1 Ц Select the Office button located on the top left. Step 2 Ц Select УAccess OptionsФ, located at the bottom. Step 3 Ц Access Options window is open. Apr 20, †Ј This sample clip is part of a training course for Access that will explain the basics of macros. The training course is published by Retrieve Technologi.

Join Stack Overflow to learn, share knowledge, and build your career. Connect and share knowledge within a single location that is structured and easy to search. I'd like to have a macro, called Macro1, for example, run every day at 9 AM. It works great on its own from the VB code editor in Access but I would like it to be able to execute automatically without access being open.

Please note that I don't want there to have to be any human intervention, it needs to be able to run automatically without someone opening Access to trigger autoexec or onload or something similar.

You can use a MS Access command line switch to run a macro. If you search for "commandline" in Access help, the topic "Startup command-line options" gives you all the commandline switches.

The switch for running a macro is x macro. So, if you write your macro to run whatever you want and have it exit Access when it finishes, you can then create a commandline that will do the trick and put it in a batch file that the Windows Task Scheduler can execute.

However, as I said in a comment above, if you are just running some queries, I'd say it makes more sense to bypass Access entirely and use DAO directly in a scheduled vbScript to execute the queries.

Application" accessApp. Stack Overflow for Teams Ч Collaborate and share knowledge with what is a galley book private group.

Create a free Team What is Teams? Learn more. Asked 10 years, 6 months ago. Active 7 years, 5 months ago. Viewed 52k times. Is this at all possible? Can't you do the same trick in another language? Philippe: Basically, I need to pull data from another database on a schedule. Data is being entered in another database managed by some crappy software that I'm not allowed touching. I need to get some information that's entered every day and I want to be able to do so without having to have someone open access and click something every day.

Not necessarily run it without running access, but instead open access and execute that macro then exit if that makes more sense. If you're just running queries, then you can do it with DAO via vbScript. For the macro, see my answer. Add a comment. Active Oldest Votes. This sounds good. It's not just some queries although that is part of it. I need to query how to get chinese citizenship linked table from another database and update content in the current database.

I'm not sure what the differences is between running some queries and "querying a linked table If it's not, maybe it should be? Yeah, it is done by querying it.

But then I need to use the results to update part of another local table. I'm still not getting why "using the results to update" something else prohibits what I'm suggesting. Show 5 more comments. You must create vbscript to run your macro and create a batch file to schedule your vbscript. Run "Macroname",param1, param2,param3 accessApp. You're almost 3 years late and this project is no longer relevant for me. There is already an accepted answer. Perhaps your answer will still help someone else though.

Thanks for posting. Why not just run the macro directly? Fionnuala Fionnuala So I would essentially schedule a script to run every day at a certain time and then have that script open access and execute a macro? Is this doable? Sign up or log in Sign up using Google.

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On the Create tab, in the Macros & Code group, click Macro. Access opens the Macro Builder. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save. In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the macro. In order to create a macro by using the Macro Builder feature, go to the Create ribbon and on the Other group, click on Macro. Figure 1 Click to create a macro From the drop down list, choose Macro. You can use a MS Access command line switch to run a macro. If you search for "commandline" in Access help, the topic "Startup command-line options" gives you all the commandline switches. The switch for running a macro is x macro.

You can use Access macros to create custom shortcut menus that appear when you right-click forms, reports, or individual controls. You can also create custom menus that appear on the Ribbon for specific forms or reports.

To create a menu by using macros, you perform three main steps:. The following sections walk you through these steps in detail. Note: Are you using Access ?

If so, skip down to the section Create custom shortcut menus in Access Tip: If you want to learn how to create custom shortcut menus in Access using Visual Basic for Applications VBA code, see the article Create a shortcut menu for a form, form control, or report. In this step, you create a macro object with submacros, each submacro of which will be a separate command on your shortcut menu. What is a submacro? You can use a submacro within a macro object to define a set of macro actions.

Submacros within a macro object can be called separately from various control and object events. The individual submacros within a macro object each have a unique name and can contain one or more macro actions. Add a Submacro Macro statement to the macro design window and name the submacro what you want to display on the shortcut menu for example, "Print" or "Refresh".

This letter will be underlined on the menu. Within the submacro, select the first action you would like to take place when you click the command on the shortcut menu. If there are more actions that you want to take place when you select this command, add them as separate macro actions within the same submacro.

Save and name the macro object for example, mcrShortcutMenuCommands. The following illustration shows an example macro object with three submacros for a custom menu or shortcut menu.

This step might seem redundant, but to create the shortcut menu from the macro object that you created in Step 1, you must create a second macro object that contains the AddMenu macro action. This macro action is sometimes called the "menu macro". This argument is not required, but is recommended if, in Step 3, you plan to add the menu to a Ribbon tab such as the Add-Ins tab of a form or report.

If the menu is added as a shortcut menu in Step 3, the Menu Name argument is ignored. In the Menu Macro Name argument box, enter the name of the macro object that you created in Step 1. Save and name this second macro object, for example, mcrAddShortcutMenu.

The following illustration shows an example menu macro object that creates the menu we designed in Step 1. Depending on where you want the menu to appear, use one or more of the following procedures. Add the menu to the Add-Ins tab of a form or report.

Use this procedure if you want the menu to appear on the Add-Ins tab for a specific form or report.

In the Navigation Pane, right-click the form or report where you want the menu to appear, and then click Design View. On the Design tab, in the Tools group, click Property Sheet. Select the entire object by selecting Form or Report from the list at the top of the Property Sheet task pane.

The next time you open the form or report, the Add-Ins tab appears in the Ribbon. Click the tab to see the menu, as shown in the following illustration:. For more information about Ribbon customization techniques, such as adding custom tabs or hiding the default tabs, see the article Create a custom ribbon in Access. Add the menu as a shortcut menu for a form, report, or control. Use this procedure if you want the menu to appear when you right-click a specific form, report, or control.

In the Navigation Pane, right-click the form or report where you want the shortcut menu to appear, and then click Design View. To select the entire object, select Form or Report from the list at the top of the Property Sheet task pane.

Make sure the Shortcut Menu property is set to Yes. The next time you open the form or report and then right-click the form, report or control, you'll see your shortcut menu with the associated commands, as shown in the following illustration:. Add the menu as a global shortcut menu. This procedure replaces all of the default shortcut menus in the current database. Custom shortcut menus that you have attached to specific forms, reports, or controls are not affected.

In the Access Options dialog box, click Current Database. Click OK to save your changes in the Access Options dialog box. Custom shortcut menus replace the default shortcut menus for the objects they are attached to.

If you want to retain certain Access commands to use on these menus, use the RunCommand macro action to put the commands into the macro objects for the menus you want them in. A custom shortcut menu that is attached to a control supersedes any other custom shortcut menus that are defined in the database. A custom shortcut menu that is attached to a form or report supersedes a custom global shortcut menu. When you specify a menu macro for a form or report or for the database, Access runs this menu macro whenever the form, report, or database is opened.

If you make changes to the menu macro object or the macro object that defines its commands while the form, report, or database is open, you must close the form, report, or database and reopen it to see the changes.

To create a submenu on a shortcut menu list of commands, follow Step 1 to create a separate macro object that contains only the submenu commands, as shown in the following illustration:. Then, follow Step 1 again to define the commands for the higher-level menu object.

Add the submenu as an item in the higher-level macro object by using the AddMenu macro action. The following illustration shows the macro object for a menu that contains a submenu. The third submacro in this example macro object creates the Export to The following illustration shows the resulting completed shortcut menu with a submenu:. You can create multiple levels of submenus by using AddMenu macro actions in the macro objects for each level of menu. Make sure to supply a value for the Menu Name argument for each AddMenu action, otherwise the submenu will appear as a blank line in the higher-level menu.

In other words, you can use a condition expression in a menu macro object to determine if a particular menu or shortcut menu will be displayed, but only for the menus on the top level. You can't use condition expressions to display or hide commands or submenus on the menus. You can also use a condition expression to hide or show a custom shortcut menu or global shortcut menu. Optionally, the menu macro that you create in Step 2 can be part of a macro object.

For example, if you have several shortcut menus for different objects or controls, you can create a single macro object that contains all of the necessary menu macros. Make sure to have a unique name for each submacro. In Step 3, use the following notation to refer to the macro: MacroObjectName. For example, mcrAddShortcutMenus. Top of Page. The macro design window is different in Access compared to later versions so expand the following sections to follow along if you're using Access In this step, you create a macro group, each macro of which will be a separate command on your shortcut menu.

A macro group is a single macro object that contain two or more independent macros. The individual macros are identified by typing a name for each macro in the Macro Names column. In the following illustration, Macro3 is a macro group. NotFoundMsg and FoundMsg are individual macros within the group, each macro consisting of two macro actions. Note: The Macro Name column is hidden by default. On the Create tab, in the Other group, click Macro. If this command is unavailable, click the arrow beneath either the Module or the Class Module button, and then click Macro.

In the Macro Name column, enter the text that you want to display on the shortcut menu for example, "Print report" or "Save". In the Action column, select the first action you would like to take place when you click the command on the shortcut menu. If there are more actions that you want to take place when you select this command, add them on the subsequent lines.

For each subsequent action, leave the Macro Name cell blank. Note: To create a line between two menu commands, type a hyphen - in the Macro Name column between the appropriate menu commands. Save and name the macro, for example, mcrShortcutMenuCommands. This step might seem redundant, but to create the shortcut menu from the macro group that you created in Step 1, you must create a second macro that contains the AddMenu macro action.

This macro is sometimes called the "menu macro". On the first line of the macro, select AddMenu in the Action list. In the Menu Macro Name box, enter the name of the macro that you created in Step 1. Save and name the macro, for example, mcrAddShortcutMenu.

The following illustration shows an example menu macro that creates the menu we designed in Step 1. Use this procedure if you want the menu to appear on the Add-Ins tab for a specific form or report, as shown in the following illustration:. Click the tab to see the menu.

Use this procedure if you want the menu to appear when you right-click a specific form, report, or control, as shown in the following illustration:. Note: To select the entire object, select Form or Report from the list at the top of the Property Sheet task pane. If you want to retain certain Access commands to use on these menus, use the RunCommand action to put the commands into the macro groups for the menus you want them in.

If you make changes to the menu macro or the macro group that defines its commands while the form, report, or database is open, you must close the form, report, or database and reopen it to see the changes. To create a submenu, follow Step 1 to create a separate macro group that contains only the submenu commands.

Then, follow Step 1 again to define the commands for the higher-level menu. Add the submenu as an item in the higher-level macro group by using the AddMenu macro action. The following illustration shows the macro group for a menu that contains a submenu, and then shows the resulting shortcut menu.





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